Category Archives: flowers

Continuity

Many years ago, I somehow obtained an interesting African Violet plant.  If I remember correctly, I got it while I was still an undergraduate student at SUNY ESF in the early 1970s.  I was into house plants at the time and I was struck by this particular plant because unlike all the other African Violets I had seen, this one had leaves with wavy edges.  So it made it into my plant collection.

My Mom was also taken with it so I gave her a couple of leaves which she rooted. Over the years, I remember seeing it from time to time when I would visit my parents but it eventually faded from my memory.

Fast forward to 2015.  I’m helping my Mom clean out her house sometime after my Dad passed away and she points to an African Violet she has and says “Do you remember this African Violet that you gave me all those years ago” or something like that.  “Well, this is the same plant”  I was flabbergasted and elated at the same time.

“Really,” I said.  “Oh, I have to have one again.”  Now it has been years since I did much with house plants.  Oh, I had the occasional one, and I had balcony plants on my condos and I have a great rubber tree plant that I’ve had for years but my partner, J, is into plants in a big way and I just knew she’d love it.

Well, I live in British Columbia, Canada and Mom lives in Greenville, North Carolina so we hatched a plan.  The next time she came to visit family on the West Coast, she would bring a couple of leaves and I would get them back to my home in BC.  And that’s what we did.  We had a family wedding in Portland, Oregon and Mom brought a few leaves in her luggage.  She had put them in a plastic ziploc bag wrapped in moist paper towels to keep them from drying out.

As we had driven down to Portland from Vancouver, BC, it was no problem to get the leaves back across the border and into our home.

I put them in water, they successfully rooted and I planted them in small pots.  I gave one plant to one of our good friends who also loves plants and just waited for the other plants to grow.  And grow they did.

A couple of days ago, we were in a dollar store and saw some great pots and I thought, perfect for the violets. Yesterday, I transplanted them and one of them had already started to flower.  That was one of the things I also liked about these African Violets.  They liked to flower over and over and over….

And so the circle is now completed and continues.  I was able to subdivide the original plants from the 2 leaves into 4 new ones and will keep passing them along to family and friends.

Enjoy.

20170501_103359_HDR20170501_103420_HDR

Rich

Left Coast and Redwoods Trip – Part 2

Day 3

We spent a wonderful morning with our friends in Roseburg – actually in the countryside between Sutherlin and Roseburg – and they gave us a whole host of suggestions of things to see and do as we travelled down to the redwoods in California and when we headed back home via another section of the Oregon coast.

We made our way back to I5 where we headed on down to Grant’s Pass.  We wanted to take a coffee break so we got off the highway and just started heading through town.  As soon as we drove by the Bluestone Cafe, I knew we had found our coffee stop!

Coast D3-1
The Bluestone Cafe in Grant’s Pass

As the food looked really good, too, we ordered a couple of sandwiches to take on the road with us.  Good decision so we thought until we opened the bags a bit later.  Much to our surprise, although the receipt indicated we got what we ordered and paid for, what was inside was a completely different order!  And as I’m a pescavore and both sandwiches had meat, I pretty much had to make do with a bit of bread and some granola bars for lunch.  Even so, everyone makes mistakes and I’d still give top ratings for this place!! The bevvies were perfect 🙂

From Grant’s Pass, we picked up Highway 199, which is also called the Redwood Highway.  One of the places our friends had recommended we stop at was Jedidiah Smith Redwoods State Park.  So we did.  It comes up about 45 minutes or so after you cross into California. We spent about an hour there just walking a little loop and having our first experience amongst the big trees.  Here’s some big tree photos from the park.

There were also scads of white trilliums in bloom on the forest floor and I’m still striving for a perfect spring trillium shot.  I take a bunch every year.  Here’s a few of this year’s contenders from the park.  Coast D3-7Coast D3-6Coast D3-5

There was also a lovely bright red mushroom which cried out to be photographed.

Coast D3-8
Maybe Hygrophorus coccineus also known as Scarlet Waxy Cap.

And here’s one of the giants just hanging out in the forest.  No trail to it.  I just enjoyed seeing it so nicely ensconced in all the other foliage and shrubbery.  Coast D3-9

So, back into the car and on down the highway.  We stopped at a pull off somewhere’s down the road from Crescent City for a bit of a beach break.Coast D3-10Coast pano D3-12Coast pano D3-1

From here, we headed down to our ultimate destination, the Humboldt Redwoods State Park and the Avenue of the Giants in Phillipsville, where we had booked what we thought was a nice AirBnB cottage.  Hoo boy were we surprised when it turned out to be a pretty down and out motel.  It’s amazing how good you can make something look if you take pictures of it from a certain angle in just the right light.

By the time we rolled in around 8 PM or so, it was too late to do anything about it so we made the best of it.  We headed to the Riverwood Inn, a restaurant/bar across the street from the motel and had a pretty good Mexican dinner so it was not a complete disaster.

Then we rolled into bed and made plans for spending the next day gawking at the big trees.

Well, I think that’s enough for now.  I’ll finish this trip report with the next installment.

Happy Ramblings,

Rich

Wells Gray Park – East Trophy Ridge

It’s been a while since I did a “trip report” so this week, I thought I’d share one of the hikes we did last August in Wells Gray Provincial Park, BC.

Wells Gray has become one of our favourite places to go for a long 4-5 day weekend.  The first time we went several years ago, we had a friend who had a house there she wasn’t using and she let us stay in it.  After that trip, we were hooked on this park and area. There’s so much to see and explore, especially if you like waterfalls, which we do, and lots of opportunities to hike into the alpine so we couldn’t wait to return.

If you do decide to visit this park, be sure to stop in at the visitor’s centre right off the highway and pick up a copy of Roland Neave’s book, Exploring Wells Gray Park.  It’s the best guide to the area.  We got a copy of the 5th edition the first time we were there and were so impressed with it that when we went this past summer, we were happy to scoop up the newer 6th edition.  And you can get it before you go, online!

This post I’m just going to focus on one hike that we did, the hike up the East Ridge of Trophy Mt.  Trophy Mt is one of the major mountains in the park and you can come at it from various directions.  Last time we headed onto its West slopes via Sheila lake so this time we wanted to try the other side.

We were not disappointed!  It’s a great hike and you are rewarded with many great panoramic vistas once you actually get into the alpine, which only takes about 90 minutes or so.  On the way up from the trail head, we were rewarded with lovely meadows that still had lots of flowers and stunning views of Raft Mt to the South, another peak we’d like to explore next time we go.

The first part of the trail takes you through some lovely forest with a couple of great scraggly trees.  Here’s one I really liked.

scraggly-tree-1

And a bit of wildlife on the way up.  A butterfly perched on an aster.

butterfly-1
Butterfly and flies perched on aster

As I mentioned, you pass through some lovely meadows before the views of Raft Mt start to come into play.

alpine-meadow-pano-e-trophy-1

As you gain elevation, you begin to get views of Raft behind you so don’t forget to turn around and look because the light will definitely change on the way down and you don’t want to miss the changes.

A few pics of Raft Mt on the way up into the alpine.

east-trophy-ridge-trail-1
The Raft Mt complex

 

raft-pano-3
stitched pano from another viewpoint

 

And then you enter the alpine and things start opening up.

alpine-pano-1
a less than perfect pano stitch but you get the idea!

Now we’re really getting into the alpine and things open up with lots of territory to explore.  You come to a cabin and from there you can go several ways.  We stayed East, wandered up that ridge and eventually came to a lovey viewpoint where we had lunch and just chilled out on the rocks enjoying the views for a while.

janet-on-e-trophy-ridge-1
J’s a happy hiker 🙂

Our high point and lunch spot.

east-trophy-ridge-pano-w-hat-1
My (Scrambler’s) signature mountain “selfie”.  I always photo my hat at the highest point I reach on a hike, especially if there’s a view.

A bit of a closeup of the what you see past the selfie hat.

e-trophy-n-pano-no-hat-2
See what I mean about so much to explore!

I thought about heading up that bump foreground left but we decided we’d had enough elevation gain for the day and after lunch headed back down.  Did a bit of loop to get back to the cabin and then headed back down to the car.

raft-mt-again-1
Black and white of meadows and Raft Mt on the way back down. 

On the way back to the car I took a few more flower pics.  Here’s one of a lousewort species.

lousewort-1

We also ran across a bit of wildlife, too.

grouse-1
female spruce grouse if I’m not mistaken.

And then just because I happen to be a fun guy who likes fungi, had to take a quick shot of this one.

coral-fungus-1
choral fungus spp.

Well I took almost 200 pics on this hike so you can see I’ve really held back here and saved you from 40 pics of Raft from different viewpoints and so many flowered meadows.  You just gotta go and see it for yourself!

Keep on ramblin’

Rich